Great Big Stories (GBS): Two-Eyed Seeing
Opens Oct 17 2022 09:00 AM (EDT)
Deadline Nov 18 2022 11:59 PM (EST)
Description

Frayme wants to hear your story, exploring how two-eyed seeing approaches can be used within Integrated Youth Services (IYS) initiatives. We want to collaborate, in partnership, with Inuit, First Nations and Métis-led youth-serving organizations or groups, to help amplify and share their stories about two-eyed seeing.

Two-eyed seeing is an approach of inquiry and solutions in which people come together to view the world through different perspectives: an Indigenous lens with one eye, and a Western lens through the other. GBS: Two-eyed seeing is Frayme’s third GBS grant, focusing on efforts and initiatives to address youth mental health and substance use (YMHSU) that include this Indigenous lens. Examples of two-eyed seeing approaches may include advancing or expanding on Indigenous ways of working, efforts to embrace decolonization of services, working in a good way, or working towards addressing issues of truth and reconciliation.  

At Frayme, we recognize the historical truths of oppression, marginalization, epistemicide, and genocide against Inuit, First Nations and Métis peoples.  This includes the horrendous abuses at residential schools and the ongoing suffering and intergenerational trauma this has caused. Frayme deeply values the voices of the survivors and aims to ensure meaningful decolonization among youth mental health and substance use organizations. For this reason, we have set out to amplify the stories of organizations working to decolonize services by embracing two-eyed seeing.

Integrated Youth Services (IYS) represent an approach that aims to build effective, youth-focused and integrated services for mental health, substance use and related issues. It is defined by a set of guiding principles for delivering community-based mental health and substance use services alongside additional needed youth supports. IYS is transforming youth mental health and substance use services in communities across Canada and helping to ensure that youth have equitable access to the range of services they need when they need them. However, it is still unclear how IYS can best serve and work with Indigenous youth and caregivers. For the purposes of this grant, we are interested in exploring how two-eyed seeing approaches are used, or can be used, to help inform IYS initiatives. Two-eyed seeing approaches may include (a) advancing Inuit, First Nations and Métis ways of working to support youth, (b) efforts to embrace decolonization of services, (c) working in a good way, or (d) working to address issues of truth and reconciliation.

For the purposes of this grant, we are interested in Indigenous-led youth service programs or wholistic youth efforts (including IYS- affiliated hubs) and determining how they can best work in partnership with IYS or Mental Wellness Teams (MWT). MWTs are a “community-based and multi-disciplinary team approach to providing mental health and addictions services in First Nations and Inuit communities that blends or enhances traditional, cultural and mainstream approaches. The MWT approach is designed to complement and support efforts that are currently in place in First Nations on-reserve and Inuit communities.”.

Frayme will support grants of up to $20,000 each. 

Goals: The goals of the grant include supporting Inuit, First Nations and Métis-led youth-serving organizations or groups to: 

  1. Share a “story” about their collaborative mental health or substance use policy, program or initiative that showcases two-eyed seeing. Methods to tell this story will be co-developed with organizations but can include written narratives, video, other arts-based methods (e.g., dance), or traditional methodologies of storytelling.    

  1. Co-create a learning and implementation guide that answers:

    • How has your program or initiative advanced or used two-eyed seeing? 

    • What has worked well for your community, including the youth you serve?  

      • To what extent and why? Why is “what worked” important? 

    • What has been challenging for your community and/or about the collaboration?

      • Why and what could have been done differently? 

    • How did you develop, and how have you implemented your initiative or program?

      • What should others know so they can implement it? What are key takeaways or lessons learned?  

    • How do you plan to improve and evaluate your program or initiative over time?  

Who: These grants are for Inuit, First Nations and Métis-led youth-serving organizations or groups designing or implementing mental health or substance use services or initiatives that are working towards the decolonization of services through a two-eyed seeing approach. We are specifically interested in organizations that are working together, in a province or territory or in a pan-Canadian way, to serve youth through IYS hubs and/or wholistic services (such as MWT). Two-eyed seeing approaches may include advancing or expanding Indigenous ways of working to support youth, efforts to embrace decolonization of services, working in a good way, or working to address issues of truth and reconciliation. 

How: Successful organizations and/or groups will be asked to work together with the Frayme team to share learnings about their youth policy, program, service and/or initiative to share learnings across the national YMHSU system.  

When: These grants will be awarded through an independent review process that will run for a period of 2-3 weeks. Reviewers will hold diverse experiences and identities. Funding is projected to be awarded by December 2022. Funding as a part of this grant program ends in January 2024. 

For more information on this Grant, including the FAQ, please see: https://frayme.ca/great-big-stories-two-eyed-seeing-grant-program 


Great Big Stories (GBS): Two-Eyed Seeing


Frayme wants to hear your story, exploring how two-eyed seeing approaches can be used within Integrated Youth Services (IYS) initiatives. We want to collaborate, in partnership, with Inuit, First Nations and Métis-led youth-serving organizations or groups, to help amplify and share their stories about two-eyed seeing.

Two-eyed seeing is an approach of inquiry and solutions in which people come together to view the world through different perspectives: an Indigenous lens with one eye, and a Western lens through the other. GBS: Two-eyed seeing is Frayme’s third GBS grant, focusing on efforts and initiatives to address youth mental health and substance use (YMHSU) that include this Indigenous lens. Examples of two-eyed seeing approaches may include advancing or expanding on Indigenous ways of working, efforts to embrace decolonization of services, working in a good way, or working towards addressing issues of truth and reconciliation.  

At Frayme, we recognize the historical truths of oppression, marginalization, epistemicide, and genocide against Inuit, First Nations and Métis peoples.  This includes the horrendous abuses at residential schools and the ongoing suffering and intergenerational trauma this has caused. Frayme deeply values the voices of the survivors and aims to ensure meaningful decolonization among youth mental health and substance use organizations. For this reason, we have set out to amplify the stories of organizations working to decolonize services by embracing two-eyed seeing.

Integrated Youth Services (IYS) represent an approach that aims to build effective, youth-focused and integrated services for mental health, substance use and related issues. It is defined by a set of guiding principles for delivering community-based mental health and substance use services alongside additional needed youth supports. IYS is transforming youth mental health and substance use services in communities across Canada and helping to ensure that youth have equitable access to the range of services they need when they need them. However, it is still unclear how IYS can best serve and work with Indigenous youth and caregivers. For the purposes of this grant, we are interested in exploring how two-eyed seeing approaches are used, or can be used, to help inform IYS initiatives. Two-eyed seeing approaches may include (a) advancing Inuit, First Nations and Métis ways of working to support youth, (b) efforts to embrace decolonization of services, (c) working in a good way, or (d) working to address issues of truth and reconciliation.

For the purposes of this grant, we are interested in Indigenous-led youth service programs or wholistic youth efforts (including IYS- affiliated hubs) and determining how they can best work in partnership with IYS or Mental Wellness Teams (MWT). MWTs are a “community-based and multi-disciplinary team approach to providing mental health and addictions services in First Nations and Inuit communities that blends or enhances traditional, cultural and mainstream approaches. The MWT approach is designed to complement and support efforts that are currently in place in First Nations on-reserve and Inuit communities.”.

Frayme will support grants of up to $20,000 each. 

Goals: The goals of the grant include supporting Inuit, First Nations and Métis-led youth-serving organizations or groups to: 

  1. Share a “story” about their collaborative mental health or substance use policy, program or initiative that showcases two-eyed seeing. Methods to tell this story will be co-developed with organizations but can include written narratives, video, other arts-based methods (e.g., dance), or traditional methodologies of storytelling.    

  1. Co-create a learning and implementation guide that answers:

    • How has your program or initiative advanced or used two-eyed seeing? 

    • What has worked well for your community, including the youth you serve?  

      • To what extent and why? Why is “what worked” important? 

    • What has been challenging for your community and/or about the collaboration?

      • Why and what could have been done differently? 

    • How did you develop, and how have you implemented your initiative or program?

      • What should others know so they can implement it? What are key takeaways or lessons learned?  

    • How do you plan to improve and evaluate your program or initiative over time?  

Who: These grants are for Inuit, First Nations and Métis-led youth-serving organizations or groups designing or implementing mental health or substance use services or initiatives that are working towards the decolonization of services through a two-eyed seeing approach. We are specifically interested in organizations that are working together, in a province or territory or in a pan-Canadian way, to serve youth through IYS hubs and/or wholistic services (such as MWT). Two-eyed seeing approaches may include advancing or expanding Indigenous ways of working to support youth, efforts to embrace decolonization of services, working in a good way, or working to address issues of truth and reconciliation. 

How: Successful organizations and/or groups will be asked to work together with the Frayme team to share learnings about their youth policy, program, service and/or initiative to share learnings across the national YMHSU system.  

When: These grants will be awarded through an independent review process that will run for a period of 2-3 weeks. Reviewers will hold diverse experiences and identities. Funding is projected to be awarded by December 2022. Funding as a part of this grant program ends in January 2024. 

For more information on this Grant, including the FAQ, please see: https://frayme.ca/great-big-stories-two-eyed-seeing-grant-program 


Opens
Oct 17 2022 09:00 AM (EDT)
Deadline
Nov 18 2022 11:59 PM (EST)